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Rest after Battle (Hadith No. 2697)

Bismillah.

Ahadith 2692 – 2696 (below) are repeats. See linked text for related posts.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 295 :
Narrated by Ibn ‘Abbas (radiallaahu `anhu)
A man came to the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) and said, “O Allah’s Apostle! I have enlisted in the army for such-and-such Ghazwa, and my wife is leaving for Hajj.” Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “Go back and perform Hajj with your wife.”

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 296 :
Narrated by Az-Zuhri (radiallaahu `anhu)
As follows in Hadith 297.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 297 :
Narrated by Abu Huraira (radiallaahu `anhu)
We were in the company of Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) in a Ghazwa, and he remarked about a man who claimed to be a Muslim, saying, “This (man) is from the people of the (Hell) Fire.” When the battle started, the man fought violently till he got wounded. Somebody said, “O Allah’s Apostle! The man whom you described as being from the people of the (Hell) Fire fought violently today and died.” The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “He will go to the (Hell) Fire.” Some people were on the point of doubting (the truth of what the Prophet had said) while they were in this state, suddenly someone said that he was still alive but severely wounded. When night fell, he lost patience and committed suicide. The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) was informed of that, and he said, “Allah is Greater! I testify that I am Allah’s Slave and His Apostle.” Then he ordered Bilal (radiallaahu `anhu) to announce amongst the people: ‘None will enter Paradise but a Muslim, and Allah may support this religion (i.e. Islam) even with a disobedient man.’

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 298 :
Narrated by Anas bin Malik (radiallaahu `anhu)
Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) delivered a sermon and said, “Zaid received the flag and was martyred, then Ja’far took it and was martyred, then ‘Abdullah bin Rawaha took it and was martyred, and then Khalid bin Al-Walid took it without being appointed, and Allah gave him victory.” The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) added, “I am not pleased (or they will not be pleased) that they should remain (alive) with us,” while his eyes were shedding tears.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 299 :
Narrated by Anas (radiallaahu `anhu)
The people of the tribes of Ril, Dhakwan, ‘Usiya and Bani Lihyan came to the Prophet and claimed that they had embraced Islam, and they requested him to support them with some men to fight their own people. The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) supported them with seventy men from the Ansar whom we used to call Al-Qurra'(i.e. Scholars) who (out of piety) used to cut wood during the day and pray all the night. So, those people took the (seventy) men till they reached a place called Bi’r-Ma’ana where they betrayed and martyred them. So, the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) invoked evil on the tribe of Ril, Dhakwan and Bani Lihyan for one month in the prayer.
Narrated Qatada: Anas (radiallaahu `anhu) told us that they (i.e. Muslims) used to recite a Quranic Verse concerning those martyrs which was:– “O Allah! Let our people be informed on our behalf that we have met our Lord Who has got pleased with us and made us pleased.” Then the Verse was cancelled.

Today’s Hadith:

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 300 :
Narrated by Abu Talha (radiallaahu `anhu)
Whenever the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) conquered some people, he would stay in their town for three days.

As per the rights of the guest, three days of hospitality is the minimum, hence the habit of Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam). And this gave enough time to let the fighters and their animals recuperate from battle and prepare for the journey home.

rest

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Be the Ideal Guest (Hadith No. 2138)

Bismillah.

Ahadith 2136 and 2137 (below) are repeats. Related posts have been linked.

Volume 3, Book 43, Number 639:
Narrated ‘Abdullah bin ‘Amr (radiallaahu `anhu):
The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “Whoever has (the following) four characters will be a hypocrite, and whoever has one of the following four characteristics will have one characteristic of hypocrisy until he gives it up. These are: (1 ) Whenever he talks, he tells a lie; (2) whenever he makes a promise, he breaks it; (3) whenever he makes a covenant he proves treacherous; (4) and whenever he quarrels, he behaves impudently in an evil insulting manner.”

Volume 3, Book 43, Number 640:
Narrated Aisha (radiallaahu `anhaa):
Hind bint ‘Utba (Abu Sufyan’s wife) came and said, “O Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam)! Abu Sufyan is a miser. Is there any harm if I spend something from his property for our children?” He said, there is no harm for you if you feed them from it justly and reasonably (with no extravagance).”

Today’s Hadith:

Volume 3, Book 43, Number 641:
Narrated ‘Uqba bin ‘Amir (radiallaahu `anhu):
We said to the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam), “You send us out and it happens that we have to stay with such people that do not entertain us. What do you think about it? He said to us, “If you stay with some people and they entertain you as they should for a guest, accept their hospitality, but if they don’t, take the right of the guest from them.”

And what is the right of guest? Three days of hospitality tops.. Read on.

 

“Etiquette guide for being the ideal guest”

By Abdul Malik Mujahid

Whether it’s your uncle in the Middle East, your aunt in the Midwest, your friend in Malaysia, or your nephew in Pakistan, invitations from relatives to visit for most Muslims are not scarce, Alhamdu lillah.

And why not? Welcoming guests is a part of our way of life as Muslims. But being a good guest is the other side of this coin. Below are some tips to keep your hosts happy and your visit virtually problem-free.

Tip #1: Don’t overstay

Khalid ibn Amr relates that he heard the Messenger of God, the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) saying: He who believes in God and the Last Day should honor his guest as he deserves.

He was asked: ‘And what does he deserve, O Messenger of God?’ and he answered:

‘A day and a night of what he deserves, and hospitality for three days. More than this is charity.’ (Bukhari, Muslim).

As the above-mentioned Hadith indicates, guests are to be welcomed. But this openness and generosity should not be abused so as to be a burden on the hosts.

This factor should be taken into consideration for those of us who come from families back home who may not be well off financially. We should act wisely and judge for ourselves how long is too long for our hosts.

Tip #2: Give gifts

It is narrated by Aisha that the Messenger of God said: ‘Exchange presents with one another, for they remove ill feelings from the hearts.’ (Tirmidhi).

What better way to bridge the gap between relatives hundreds or thousands of miles away than to give a gift? In particular, encourage kids to give gifts to relatives of the same age and gender. This may be the springboard to developing a deep, meaningful friendship, not just a blood relationship. But these gifts should not become an excuse for extravagance or showing off, both of which are condemned by Islam.

Tip #3: Receive gifts graciously

Giving gifts is only one part of the equation. Receiving gifts is the other. Adults and young people coming from North America may have become used to the idea of exchanging gifts they may have too many of or may not like.

This is not acceptable when visiting friends and relatives, especially those in a Muslim country or from one. Such behavior could be considered obnoxious and ungrateful.

Accept all gifts graciously. Even if it’s the 100th leather wallet you’ve received, don’t make a fuss about it.

Tip #4: Respect your elders

Abu Musa Ashari related that the Messenger of God said: ‘It is part of glorifying God to show respect to a grey-haired Muslim, and to a person who can teach the Quran.’ (Abu Dawud).

Respecting your elders is a requirement of Islam, whether you’re in North America or in the Muslim world. Certain behaviors need to be avoided in this regard: speaking with disrespect, even if you disagree with an older person; stretching your legs or putting your feet up on the table in front of everyone present when there are elders there, for example.

Tip #5: Know the local customs

For example: no does not always mean no amongst some relatives and friends in Muslim countries. In other words, if you’re no longer hungry after a fantastic meal at your aunt’s and she asks you to take more dessert, your answer may be no, but that may translate as yes. For every one of your no’s, she may spoon more dessert into your bowl.

Find appropriate ways to respond to this, whether it’s by using a truthful excuse (i.e. I really will get very, very sick if I eat any more), or even better, tell her the Hadith about eating in a way that you have one-third water, one-third food and one-third air in your stomach.

The ideal guest will be polite, discreet, grateful and respectful. He or she will also make sure not to hurt the host’s feelings or be hostile.

Tip #6: Know the customs of the house

This means for example, sleeping and waking up earlier than normal if your host family is used to getting up and going to bed early. Maintaining the same schedule as you normally do at home in this case, may disrupt your host’s home life and cause problems.

Tip #7: Respect the family’s Islamicity

If you try your best to practice Islam, Alhamdu lillah. But this may not be the case with your host and their family. While your visit may be a great way to increase their Islamic awareness, it’s important to respect their privacy and not to humiliate them. That means not hitting them over the head with incessant lectures about how this and that are Haram (forbidden) in their home or how they are not practicing.

So if you wake up for Fajr, and not all members of the host family do, make Wudu and pray without disturbing others. Perhaps later in the day, you can talk about how much you enjoyed going to pray Fajr at the local mosque, or the peace and tranquility you felt praying in the silence before sunrise.

That said though, this does not mean you give up Islamic duties to please guests. Prayer, wearing appropriate Islamic attire in front of the opposite sex, for instance, must be maintained, regardless of the level of Islamicity of the host family.

Taken from SoundVision

 

Act Like A Guest! (Hadith No. 416)

Salam,
Bismillah.

We love to be invited to places as guests. We love to be served and treated nicely. We know what rights we have over our hosts. But we forget the rights hosts have over us – the guests. There are some minute things we need to take care of when in the ‘guest mode’. Today’s Hadith will help explain my point inshaAllah.

Volume 1, Book 8, Number 416:

Narrated ‘Itban bin Malik:

The Prophet came to my house and said, “Where do you like me to pray?” I pointed to a place. The Prophet then said, “Allahu Akbar”, and we aligned behind him and he offered a two-Rak’at prayer.

Note that the Prophet (SAW) asked his host where he could pray.  And when the host pointed to the place, he didn’t say whether he liked it or not. Just said ‘Allahu Akbar’ and led the prayer.

There’s an important lesson here. Always ASK your host before touching their belongings and moving around in their house. And remember all those manners they taught you in kindergarten. They’re still worth practicing!

P.S. The above depends on your host as well, e.g. if you’re visiting your mother/sister, you might not need to ‘act’ like a guest.

Wassalam.

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