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The Muslim Gentleman (Ahadith 2715 – 2716)

Bismillah.

Hadith no. 2714 (below) is a repeat. Read it here.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 317 :
Narrated by Abdullah (radiallaahu `anhu)
When the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) returned (from Jihad), he would say Takbir thrice and add, “We are returning, if Allah wishes, with repentance and worshipping and praising (our Lord) and prostrating ourselves before our Lord. Allah fulfilled His Promise and helped His Slave, and He Alone defeated the (infidel) clans.”

Today’s Ahadith:

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 318 :
Narrated by Anas bin Malik (radiallaahu `anhu)
We were in the company of the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) while returning from ‘Usfan, and Allah’s Apostle was riding his she-camel keeping Safiya bint Huyay (radiallaahu `anhaa) riding behind him. His she-camel slipped and both of them fell down. Abu Talha (radiallaahu `anhu) jumped from his camel and said, “O Allah’s Apostle! May Allah sacrifice me for you.” The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “Take care of the lady.” So, Abu Talha covered his face with a garment and went to Safiya (radiallaahu `anhaa) and covered her with it, and then he set right the condition of their she-camel so that both of them rode, and we were encircling Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) like a cover. When we approached Medina, the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “We are returning with repentance and worshipping and praising our Lord.” He kept on saying this till he entered Medina.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 319 :
Narrated by Anas bin Malik (radiallaahu `anhu)
That he and Abu Talha (radiallaahu `anhu) came in the company of the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) and Safiya (radiallaahu `anhaa) was accompanying the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam), who let her ride behind him on his she-camel. During the journey, the she-camel slipped and both the Prophet and (his) wife fell down. Abu Talha (the sub-narrator thinks that Anas said that Abu Talha jumped from his camel quickly) said, “O Allah’s Apostle! May Allah sacrifice me for your sake! Did you get hurt?” The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) replied,”No, but take care of the lady.” Abu Talha (radiallaahu `anhu) covered his face with his garment and proceeded towards her and covered her with his garment, and she got up. He then set right the condition of their she-camel and both of them (i.e. the Prophet and his wife) rode and proceeded till they approached Medina. The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “We are returning with repentance and worshipping and praising our Lord.” The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) kept on saying this statement till he entered Medina.

“Take care of the lady” =  How to be a gentleman 101.

Abu Aaliyah, blogger at The Humble “I”, talks about being a true gentleman under Islamic guidelines:

It is often claimed that in Victorian or Edwardian England, respectability essentially meant maintaining a reputable facade while encouraging all sorts of hypocrisies. How much or how little can one generalise in such a matter is up for debate. Yet at its core, the widely cherished notion that there was a respectable way to conduct oneself; that there was a decent and honourable way of being a true “gentleman” (as opposed to a hypocritical one) – well that’s a very Islamic idea. A gentleman was someone who was restrained, courteous, considerate, well mannered, had public dignity, and was aware of boundaries; particularly when in mixed company.

The Islamic concept of futuwwah, “spiritual chivalry,” is where we find the ideals of the true Muslim gentleman best expressed. Futuwwah embodies the virtues of dignity and respectability (haybah), refined and noble conduct (adab), and preferring others to oneself (ithar), along with courage (shaja‘ah), magnanimity (sakha’ah) and striving to destroy the idols of one’s ego (mujahadat al-nafs).

Society no longer speaks of a true gentleman. That’s of a bygone era – of Edwardian England; an Englishness long dead and buried. As a nation we need to review where this has led us: if it’s been, on balance, for our betterment? Furthermore, as Muslims themselves start to relax these principles, can we see in where it has led others, where we too might be heading?

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An excerpt from an article written by Imam Khalid Latif on the same topic:

In the Qur’an, the Prophet Abraham, peace be upon him, is referred to in Arabic as fata, a young, noble man who knows how to handle his responsibilities. His sense of integrity and commitment are remarkable.

From this word fata is derived the Arabic word, futuwwa, which essentially translates as chivalry. Being gentle, loyal, modest, honest, compassionate, humble, trustworthy and selfless is having futuwwa. In the medieval period of Islam, orders were established around this principle of futuwwa that emphasized members uphold these traits and seek to serve society, putting their needs after the needs of those around them. They would teach young men how to honor their responsibilities while today we are forced to figure it out on our own. Chivalry is in our tradition. We just have to embrace it again and empower individuals to be those role models that our communities desperately need.

[Read more: Are You a ‘Muslim’ Gentleman?]

So chivalry is not just how the Western culture sees it; holding the door open, pulling out the chair, paying for dinner/date etc. This is all just one aspect of it. The true concept of being a gentleman has much more to it than appearances and treatment of women (not the least important by any means), it has to do with maturity, modesty, dignity, compassion, honesty etc.

An interesting blog I came across that gives equal importance to self-grooming for the “modern Muslim gentleman” and includes tips and how-to’s, check out “thegentlemuslimman“.

Shaytaan: The Third Wheel (Hadith No. 2646)

Bismillah.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 250 :
Narrated by Ibn Abbas (radiallaahu `anhu)
That he heard the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) saying, “It is not permissible for a man to be alone with a woman, and no lady should travel except with a Mahram (i.e. her husband or a person whom she cannot marry in any case for ever; e.g. her father, brother, etc.).” Then a man got up and said, “O Allah’s Apostle! I have enlisted in the army for such-and-such Ghazwa and my wife is proceeding for Hajj.” Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “Go, and perform the Hajj with your wife.”

It is not permissible for a man to be alone with a woman who is not his mahram, because the Prophet (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) said: “No man should be alone with a woman unless there is a mahram with them.” Narrated by al-Bukhaari (1862) and Muslim (1341). And he (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) said: “No man is alone with a woman but the Shaytaan is the third one present.” Narrated by al-Tirmidhi (1171) and classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Tirmidhi.

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Al-Nawawi (may Allah have mercy on him) narrated in Sharh Muslim (14/153) that there was consensus among the scholars that it is haraam for a man to be alone with a woman who is not his mahram. This was narrated by al-Haafiz in al-Fath (4/77).

“Being alone with” (khalwah) refers to when the man and woman are in a place where no one can see them.

The scholars of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas were asked: Does khalwah (“being alone with”) refer to when a man is alone with a woman in some house, far away from the eyes of people, or does it refer to any situation in which a man is alone with a woman, even if they can be seen by others?

They replied: What is meant by the “being alone with” (khalwah) that is forbidden in sharee‘ah is not only when a man is alone with a woman who is not his mahram in a place where they cannot be seen; rather it also includes situations in which he is alone with her in a place where she can converse with him and he can converse with her, even if they can be seen by other people, but their words cannot be heard, whether that is out in the open or in a car or on the roof of a house, and so on. That is because khalwah has been forbidden because it is the harbinger of zina and the means that leads to it. So everything that could lead to that, even making an arrangement to do that later, comes under the ruling of physical khalwah or being alone in a place where they cannot be seen. End quote.

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn ‘Abd-Allah ibn Baaz; Shaykh ‘Abd al-Razzaaq ‘Afeefi; Shaykh ‘Abd-Allah ibn Ghadyaan; Shaykh ‘Abd-Allah ibn Qa ‘ood

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah, 17/57

Khalwah can be avoided with the presence of a mahram or the presence of a righteous woman, according to the correct opinion.

It says in Asna’l-Mataalib (3/407): It is permissible for a man to be alone with two women, but not the opposite; i.e., it is not permissible for two non-mahram men to be alone with a woman even if it is unlikely that they would agree to commit immoral actions, as was clearly stated by al-Nawawi in al-Majmoo‘; that is because a woman feels more shy of another woman than a man feels shy of another man.

End quote.

[IslamQA]

Of Bells and Chimes (Hadith No. 2645)

Bismillah.

Long time, eh? May Allah forgive me for my shortcomings. :(

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 249 :
Narrated by Abu Bashir Al-Ansari (radiallaahu `anhu)
That he was in the company of Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) on some of his journeys. (The sub-narrator ‘Abdullah adds, “I think that Abu Bashir (radiallaahu `anhu) also said, ‘And the people were at their sleeping places.”) Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) sent a messenger ordering: “There shall not remain any necklace of string or any other kind of necklace round the necks of camels except it is cut off.”

One of the opinions on theses ‘necklaces’ is that they refer to the bells that are hung round the necks of animals. Muslim narrated in his Saheeh (2113) from Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The angels do not accompany any group with whom there is a dog or a bell.” 

And he narrated (2114) also from Abu Hurayrah that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Bells are the musical instruments of the Shaytaan.” 

A common animal bell.

A common animal bell.

Al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: As for bells, it was said that the reason why the angels dislike them is that they are similar to church bells, or because they are one of the hanging things that are forbidden. And it was said that the reason why they are disliked is their sound, which is supported by the report which mentions “the musical instruments of the shaytaan.”

Al-Nawawi commented on this hadith in Riyad-us-Saaliheen (chapter 307):

Dog” here stands for that dog which is prohibited to keep. Dogs kept for the purpose of hunting and security do not fall in this category. Angels signify angels of mercy; otherwise we are attended all the time by the angels who record our deeds for us. Bell in this context refers to the bell which is placed in the neck of animals and rings when they move. End quote.

The reason why their sound is disliked is that it is akin to musical instruments, which are forbidden.

Al-Haafiz Ibn Hajar (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: To sum up, the sound has two qualities, one which is the strength of the sound and the other is its tune, and because of its musical tune it was prohibited, and the reason was given as being because they are “the musical instruments of the shaytaan.”

Cute? Sure. Allowed? No.

Cute? Sure. Allowed? No. Ditch the bell plis.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: (The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him)) told us that the angels do not accompany people with whom there is a bell, because when the animals walk, it will make a sound like music, and it is known that musical instruments are haraam. End quote. Sharh Riyaadh al-Saaliheen (4/340).

[IslamQA]

For further reading (in Arabic), click here.

On Traveling Alone (Ahadith 2637 – 2641)

Bismillah.

Hadith no. 2636 (below) is a repeat. Read it here.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 240 :
Narrated by Jabir bin ‘Abdullah (radiallaahu `anhu)
On the day of the battle of the Trench, the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) wanted somebody from amongst the people to volunteer to be a reconnoiter. Az-Zubair (radiallaahu `anhu) volunteered. He demanded the same again and Az-Zubair (radiallaahu `anhu) volunteered again. Then he repeated the same demand (thrice) and Az-Zubair (radiallaahu `anhu) volunteered once more. The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) then said, ” Every prophet has a disciple and my disciple is Az-Zubair.”

Today’s Hadith:

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 241 :
Narrated by Ibn’ Umar (radiallaahu `anhu)
From the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) the following Hadith (No. 242).

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 242 :
Narrated by Ibn ‘Umar (radiallaahu `anhu)
The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “If the people knew what I know about traveling alone, then nobody would travel alone at night.”

Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Silsilah al-Saheehah (1/130). 

Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Silsilah al-Saheehah (1/130).

Imam Ahmad was asked about a man spending the night alone. He said: I prefer him to avoid that. Quoted from al-Adaab al-Shar’iyyah (1/428).

It was narrated from ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Amr ibn al-‘Aas that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The (lone) rider is a devil, two riders are two devils and three are a travelling party.” Narrated by al-Tirmidhi (1674), who said it is a hasan hadeeth. It was also classed as hasan by Ibn Hajar in Fath al-Baari (6/53) and by al-Albaani in al-Silsilah al-Saheehah (62).

These ahaadeeth indicate that it is makrooh to be alone in situations where a man fears for himself because of weakness, severe exhaustion or hardship, or when he fears that the shaytaan may tempt him and mislead him. The benefit of being with righteous companions is not limited to help and support, rather the most important thing is that it helps him to remain steadfast and pious, for the shaytaan is further away from two.

Al-Haafiz Ibn Hajar said in Fath al-Baari (6/53):

Ibn Khuzaymah reported it under the heading; “the prohibition on two travelling and that less than three are sinners,” because what is meant by “devil” is a sinner. Al-Tabari said: This is a rebuke aimed at disciplining and guiding because of the fear of loneliness for one, but it is not haraam. The one who travels alone in the wilderness and the one who stays alone in a house has no guarantee that he will not feel lonely, especially if he had bad thoughts and is weak in faith.

In fact people differ with regard to that and the prohibition concerning that is a measure of protection, but if there is need for that, it should be fine. It was said, commenting on the words “the (lone) rider is a devil” that his travelling alone is suggested to him by the shaytaan, or he is likened to the shaytaan in his actions. And it was said that it is disliked because if the person who is travelling alone dies on the journey, there will be no one who can take care of him; similarly, if two are travelling and both or one die, there will be no one to help, unlike three, because in most cases that fear will not be present. End quote.

The apparent meaning of the hadeeth is that the prohibition applies to the one who travels alone via empty and remote routes. As for well-travelled routes, and those in which there is no risk of being lost, and where there are likely to be helpers and companions, there is no report that it is makrooh or prohibited. The same applies to travelling nowadays on planes, ships and buses, because those who are in them are all regarded as traveling companions, so the one who travels by these means is not alone in the sense that is forbidden.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen said in Fataawa Noor ‘ala al-Darb (mutafarraqaat/al-adaab):

This points to the warning against travelling alone, but that applies to journeys where the route is not travelled by many. As for journeys where the route is travelled by many, and it is as if one is in the middle of a village, such as the route from al-Qaseem to Riyadh, or Riyadh to Dammam and other such routes where there are many travellers, and the road to the Hijaz during the Hajj season, this is not in fact regarded as being alone, because many people travel by these routes. So a person may be alone in his car but he is not alone on the journey, rather there are people around him, behind him and in front of him at every moment. End quote.

Shaykh al-Albaani said in his commentary on this hadeeth in al-Saheehah (62):

Perhaps the hadeeth refers to travelling in the deserts or wilderness where the traveller rarely sees anyone. It does not include travel nowadays on paved and well-travelled roads. And Allaah knows best. End quote.

Taken from IslamQA

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 243 :
Narrated by Hisham’s father
Usama bin Zaid (radiallaahu `anhu) was asked at what pace the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) rode during Hajjat-ul-Wada’ “He rode at a medium pace, but when he came upon an open way he would go at full pace.”

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 244 :
Narrated by Aslam
While I was in the company of ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umar (radiallaahu `anhu) on the way to Mecca, he received the news of the severe illness of Safiya bint Abi Ubaid (i.e. his wife), so he proceeded at greater speed, and when the twilight disappeared, he dismounted and offered the Maghrib and ‘Isha ‘prayers together and said, “I saw the Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) delaying the Maghrib prayer to offer it along with the ‘Isha’ when he was in a hurry on a journey.”

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 245 :
Narrated by Abu Huraira (radiallaahu `anhu)
Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, “Journey is a piece of torture, for it disturbs one’s sleep, eating and drinking. So, when you fulfill your job, you should hurry up to your family.”

Get Rewarded for NOT Doing Good Deeds (Hadith No. 2635)

Bismillah.

We have established in past posts that fasting while traveling is permissible, but Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) used to avoid it. And we all know this one:

Narrated ‘Aisha (radiallaahu `anhaa):
The Prophet (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) was asked, “What deeds are loved most by Allah?” He said,

“The most regular constant deeds even though they may be few.”

[Bukhari, Vol. 8, Book 76, Number 472]

Most Beloved Deeds to Allah

Now read this.

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 239 :
Narrated by Ibrahim Abu Isma’il As-Saksaki
I heard Abu Burda (radiallaahu `anhu) who accompanied Yazid bin Abi Kabsha on a journey. Yazid used to observe fasting on journeys. Abu Burda (radiallaahu `anhu) said to him, “I heard Abu Musa (radiallaahu `anhu) several times saying that Allah’s Apostle (sallallaahu `alayhi wasallam) said, ‘When a slave falls ill or travels, then he will get reward similar to that he gets for good deeds practiced at home when in good health.”

Isn’t this like the coolest thing ever? There are so many things we end up not doing because of sickness or travel and feel guilty for leaving them. But worry not, my friend, you have been relieved of this burden. If there’s something you do continuously when at home and in good health, you’ll be rewarded for it even if you don’t do it due to sickness or travel.

I usually end up missing or shortening the adhkaar after Salah when down with fever or headache etc.. The daily reading of Quran gets disturbed while traveling.. We all miss our Sunnah prayers in long journeys anyway.. So remember this hadith next time you’re feeling unwell or out of town and relax, for the kiraaman kaatibeen are at work even if you’re not!. :)

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